Tuesday, May 24, 2016


It has been less than two months since I visited Caracas, Venezuela. While things were already very bad when I was there, they are now worse.
Power shortages have deepened (and this in an oil rich country!); food is becoming scarce (some people have resorted to eating dogs and cats); people lie on concrete slabs in hospitals without medicine (if you thought medical care was bad, just wait until it’s free!); and riots and looting are growing worse.
I went to see the end stages of socialism, complete with hyperinflation. I wanted to see where Europe and the US are headed.
In hindsight, it was shocking to see how few people in Venezuela understood what was going on.  You’d think in this day and age, they’d just watch a few Youtube videos (like some of ours) and realize the reality: Almost all their problems are a direct result of government and central banking.
Yet, hardly anyone understood.  Your average person was miserable, that was for sure.  But they didn’t know what was causing their misery.
I didn’t find much interest in gold and silver, let alone much buying, even though it was obviously a good idea.  And, forget bitcoin. No one knew what it was… except for the government that predictably has banned it.
Bizarrely, large parts of Caracas still hang pictures of Hugo Chavez and still consider him to be a hero!
I met a few people who were open to rational discussions. They were making about about $20 a month and could barely survive.
“Why don’t you go somewhere else?” I asked them. “Colombia is close.  And Trinidad & Tobago,  Aruba,  Argentina or Chile.  All with economies that are functioning and sometimes doing very well.”
The general response was, “I don’t know anyone there.”
Very strange. Why choose to live in squalor and desperation just because the environment is familiar to you?
This is a mentality I often see in America.  Elsewhere, too.  Stressed, people have a tendency to live like serfs, never venturing far from their birthplace.
It’s really not necessary in this era of the internet. Spend five minutes on Facebook and you know some people.
In fact, our global reach includes  TDV Groups (also known as the Vigilante Expat Network).  If you’re a subscriber, you can converse with other dollar vigilantes anywhere in the world. They are a great bunch. I know from experience, they’ll practically pick you up at the airport and help you get situated if you decide to visit or move.
TDV Groups
It’s just one of the many benefits of being a Dollar Vigilante newsletter subscriber (see more here).
The scary thing about Venezuela is that all the conditions already exist, and are nearly the same, in Europe right now.  And the only difference between where the US is headed and Venezuela, is the US hasn’t outlawed guns… yet.  Otherwise whatever I saw and experienced in Venezeula was already familiar to me from my travels in the US and Europe. (It’s one reason I got out and went to live in Acapulco.)
I was in Venezuela seven years ago and it was generally fine.  A beautiful place to visit full of bustling shops, restaurants, bars and hotels.  Two months ago when I returned, I was visiting the murder capital of the world. As I wrote, we had to carry backpacks of money to pay for lunch at the few restaurants that were open. We were told to not wear sunglasses or use our mobile phones or we’d get robbed. Our hotel barricaded the doors at night to keep criminals out.
Venezuela: Meet the destiny of Europe and the US.
Both Europe and the US are already tumbling further into socialism.  Nearly half of all millennials in the US say they like socialism over capitalism.
Just look at Joseph Stiglitz, the Nobel Prize winner in Economics (Keynesian/Globalist economics that is), who is one of the most respected economists in the US… He wrote The Price of Inequality and, excuse me as I hold back from vomiting, Making Globalization Work.  He’s also the former vice-president of the World Bank.
“Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez appears to have had success in bringing health and education to the people in the poor neighborhoods of Caracas, to those who previously saw few benefits of the countries oil wealth,” he said.
In his latest book “Making Globalization Work,” Stiglitz argues that left governments such as in Venezuela, “have frequently been castigated and called ‘populist’ because they promote the distribution of benefits of education and health to the poor.”
“It is not only important to have sustainable growth,” Stiglitz continued during his speech, “but to ensure the best distribution of economic growth, for the benefit of all citizens.”
And, look at this tweet from one of the top politicians in England from only three years ago!

The West is headed the way of Venezuela. In fact, it’s all part of the Globalist one world socialist government plan being quickly put into place this Jubilee Year.
You can see it in Europe, where unrestrained Islamic immigration is being aimed at creating chaos within established cultures. And in the US, where the possibility of a Hillary victory would firmly establish a Venezuela-style paradise.
This Jubilee Year is all about putting in place the final foundation for the world’s oncoming globalism. Venezuela is just a little bit ahead of the curve. For a video on this Jubilee Year and its growing damages, please see HERE. And for our White Paper, please see HERE.
I had the opportunity to interview one of the only anarcho-capitalists in Venezuela for my program, Anarchast.  It took us nearly two months to put it live because I insisted on paying Daniel to translate it. It took him nearly two months because of the nearly constant power outages.
Have a look at this conversation I had with one of the few people in Venezuela who understands economics. See how quickly things fall apart under socialism and how the US, Europe, and many other places in the West are not far behind following Venezuela’s path:

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